ECON2102: Do Consumers React to Anticipated Income Changes

ECON2102 – Journal Specifics 

ECON2102 – Journal Specifics
Version 1: 04/02/2019 (Felipe).
This document was designed to help students understand a little more about Journal activities and
what is necessary to obtain a high mark. Should further questions arise, please post them on the
Forum section for the Journal on Moodle or ask your tutor/lecturer in person.
What is the Journal?
The Journal is an ordinary book in which students are expected to write down summaries of the
tutorial readings, tutorial exercises and assignments. Even though students must write their own notes,
it will be read by someone else which implies that you must write with a clear and legible
handwriting.
Why do we have a Journal?
Over the past few years, the Journal has proven to be an effective way to make sure student keep up
with the readings required in the course. It is meant to be a simple task that will be rewarding to
students doing the work as we progress throughout the term, i.e. one of its main objectives is to
prevent students from leaving their studies to a period too close to assessments.
What goes in the Journal?
Summary of tutorial readings, tutorial exercises and assignments. Nothing else.
What does not go in the Journal?
Lecture readings, personal notes on lectures and tutorials, anything else.
How does it work?
Take the first week of tutorials for example (Week 2): we have two compulsory tutorial readings.
First, read them both carefully, take some time reflecting about the main concepts discussed and then
try to establish a connection with the content discussed in lectures. After this, write at least one
standard A4 page summarising the main ideas in the paper – you’re welcome to add some of your
personal reflections, although they won’t count towards your Journal work: the summary of the paper
is what is of most importance.
Make sure to do this weekly before the tutorial in Week 2.
During tutorials, discussions surrounding the contents of lectures and readings will take place. Often,
a list with a few tutorial problems will be handed over and students will form groups to solve those
problems: your tutorial attempt for those problems should be included in the Journal as well.
You will have two assignments throughout the term. They should both be included in the Journal as
well.
How should I structure my Journal?
There are mainly two ways of structuring your Journal:
(1) Sub-dividing your book into three well-labelled sections: one for tutorial readings, one for
tutorial exercises and the other for assignments. Notice that students are expected to keep
their work in chronological order for each of the sections.
(2) Including all activities together in chronological order. For instance, in Week 3 we have
one tutorial reading plus a set of tutorial exercises, students would be expected to have an
entry in their Journal clearly indicating the reading and the tutorial exercises.
You are free to choose whichever option you prefer, provided you stick to it. It is important to bear in
mind that Journals with poor organisation will be marked down – refer to the marking criteria below.
Make sure to clearly label your entries and present us with a neat and easy-to-navigate Journal.
When should I bring my Journal?
Students are expected to bring their Journals to all tutorial sessions. Forgetting your Journal may lead
to missing spot checks, consequently leading to lower overall Journal marks.
What is a Spot Check?
A spot check is a way of making sure students are keeping up with the work required: in a random
fashion, tutors will check if the tutorial readings for the week have been completed. As suggested in
lectures and tutorials, students are expected to do the readings prior to tutorials, and tutors will check
them with a spot check. Therefore, missing a spot check implies a lower Journal mark.
How long should the summaries be?
Summaries have to be at least one full page long. By “one page”, we mean a standard A4 page.
Do we have to handwrite our activities on the Journal?
Yes, students are required to handwrite all the work; typed comments and/or pictures/scans of
handwriting will not be ignored, reflecting negatively on the student’s Journal mark.
Notice that tutorial and assignment problems (as published on Moodle) don’t need to be handwritten
again.
What type of Journal should I get?
Organisation and tidiness are important for your Journal mark, but everyone makes mistakes. If you
know you are more prone to mistakes, it would perhaps be advisable to acquire a case with ring
binders so that pages can be easily replaced. If not, you should be fine with a standard A4 notebook.
Please, notice that notebooks smaller than the standard A4 ones will not be accepted.
I have a question that is not listed here!
First, make sure you check out the Journal section of the forum on Moodle. It will contain more
information and general questions from students: your question may have already been answered. If
not, post a question on the forum or ask your tutor/lecturer during tutorials/lectures.
Please, avoid sending unnecessary emails to lecturers and tutors.
How will the Journal be assessed?
The table below gives the general structure for the Journal mark.
The Journal component (7%) will be judged based on three criteria:
– Content and Structure: this will reflect the quality of the work being done, particular

Read the following journal:

Do Consumers React to Anticipated Income Changes?
Evidence from the Alaska Permanent Fund
By CHANG-TAI HSIEH*

Buy Now

Answer Excerpt

Do Consumers React to Anticipated Income Changes?
Evidence from the Alaska Permanent Fund
By CHANG-TAI HSIEH*



Buy Now